My chili recipe

Here is my personal chili recipe, for those that requested it:

1 1/2 pd. ground beef – use 80/20 or 85/15, but no leaner 

1 large white onion, diced

4-5 large cloves of garlic, peeled and finely minced or put through a garlic crusher

1 28 oz can crushed tomatoes

1 28oz can diced tomatoes

1 14 oz can dark red kidney beans, drained

1 14 oz can light red kidney beans, drained

3-4 tablespoons McCormick chili powder

2-3 tsp salt

ground black pepper to taste 

1 Tbsp Lowry season salt

1 tsp ground cumin

Brown the beef over medium high heat for several minutes, breaking up as it cooks.  When no longer pink, add diced onion and minced garlic and sauté until fragrant and onion becomes soft.  Season with salt and pepper to taste.  It should taste good to you.  Dump into the bottom of crock pot.

Add all of the remaining ingredients, stir well, cover and cook on low 6-8 hours.

If you use a different chili powder, you’re on your own figuring how much is enough, as various brands differ wildly in how hot they are and what other spices they contain.

You can substitute your own preference for beans.  Add more or less.  Try black beans, garbanzo beans or white kidney beans.  Or some other combo.

You can also add diced bell peppers, canned chipotle chilis, fresh minced chilis that you like, or juj it up however you like.  I usually don’t bother.

If you aren’t using a crock pot, simmer it on top of the stove for 2-3 hours.

 

 


Turkey Tetrazzini – my favorite recipe

I used to make this until I either lost or threw out the magazine that had the recipe.  Luckily, someone on the internet had re-typed it in response to someone’s question about best recipes for the disk.  This is my “go-to” recipe for this heavenly creation.

Source:  http://www.chowhound.com/post/turkey-tetrazzini-americas-test-kitchen-463386

I know this isn’t what you asked for, but I had to share.
This recipe ran in Saveur magazine in 1997. It is a staple in our house. I think we look forward to it more than the bird itself. it is rich delicious and has none of those green vegetable things.

“This creamy noodle dish, named for Italian coloratura Luisa Tetrazzini (1871-1940), is said to have originated in San Francisco. Whether it was first made with turkey or with chicken is debated, however. This is Anne Jaindl’s recipe.

1/2 pound wide egg noodles (like pappardelle, the name, appropriately, derives from the verb “pappare,” to gobble up.)
8 tablespoons butter (plus more for baking dish)
1/2 pound white mushrooms, sliced
6 tablespoons flour
salt, freshly ground pepper
3 cups turkey stock, warmed
1-1/3 cups heavy cream
1/3 cup dry sherry
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground nutmeg
3 cups coarsely chopped cooked turkey
1/4 cup freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese

  1. Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add noodles and cook until just tender. Drain and set aside
  2. Preheat oven to 375℉. Melt 2 tbs. butter in a large skillet over medium high heat. Add mushrooms and saute until lightly browned, 3-5 minutes. Add turkey and remove from pan, set aside.
  3. Melt remaining 6 tbs. better in same skillet over medium low heat. Sprinkle with flour, season with salt and pepper and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Then gradually add stock, whisking constantly. Increase heat to medium and simmer until sauce thickens, about 7 minutes. Add cream, sherry and nutmeg, adjust seasoning with salt and pepper.
  4. Place noodles in a lightly buttered medium baking dish (about 9” X 12”). Spoon turkey and mushrooms over noodles, top with sauce and sprinkle with cheese. Bake in oven until sauce is bubbly, about 30 minutes. Heat broiler and brown for 3-5 minutes. Serve warm.”

 


Getting ready for Easter 2013

She has been full of excitement all day as in “You mean TOMORROW is Easter day, Papa!?”  So we had to dye some eggs, make some treats for dinner tomorrow – deviled eggs for uncle Johnny, Liptauer cheese for an appetizer, lemon cookies for dessert, and a gallon of sweet tea for me and anyone else who wants it.  And we had a ton of fun in the process too!

Her Easter dress and shoes are all ready to go, and now just to get our clothes ready so we aren’t in such a rush tomorrow morning.

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Geraldine’s Originals

For those of you in Tallahassee who want a good source of homemade canned goods, go visit Geraldine Rudd at Geraldine’s Originals on Capital Circle NE in Tallahassee and while you are there get something good to eat. If you are from out of town, call to order your figs right away – they are going quick! Full disclosure: she’s kinfolk.

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Super Moon Buffet

For those of you in the Twin Cities, you may be interested in a new Asian buffet. It is on the south frontage road of 394 between Louisiana and Xenia. We have been watching the construction for several weeks, wondering when they would open for business. Apparently that happened last week. After reading several encouraging reviews on Yelp last night, we decided to try it for dinner tonight. The verdict? Delicious and surprising, in a good way!

We loved the decor, though just a tad on the bright side for me – but at least you can see what you are eating. I love the koi ponds at the front and it’s quite tastefully done for a buffet.

The roast duck alone is worth the price of admission in my opinion. I had three servings. The shrimp in coconut sauce was very good, and there were lots of various seafood dishes I did not try but really wanted to. The short ribs were tender and ginger-loaded, a nice twist. The fried cod was most surprising of all. Very lightly seasoned and perfectly cooked. I wanted to try several of the steamed or fried fish dishes, as well as the crab claws, the crawfish and more of the shrimp dishes. I enjoyed the dumplings and dim sum that I tried, though the hot and sour soup needed to be more of both. The sushi was plentiful, very fresh, and quite good for a buffet, though I have had better. But for the price, what can you honestly expect. Harald quite liked the Mongolian BBQ station, though you need to be patient on a busy night.

Actually, a busy night is probably the best night to go as the food is served and replenished frequently. The table service was courteous, attentive without any unnecessary hovering, and accommodating.

And best of all, kids under 3 eat free. We will definitely be going back soon. The fresh fruit selection was an attraction for Juliette as well.

I would highly recommend it. I haven’t been to a good Asian buffet since the last time I was in south Florida, and it is high time we got one here in Minneapolis. Actually, it’s in St. Louis Park, but close enough.


Cooking therapy

Cooking is almost always therapeutic for me. Today, I must have needed a lot of therapy, ’cause I did a load of cookin’. I started making bean soup first thing this morning. Then a big breakfast of cheese grits, scrambled eggs, sausage, and blueberry bread. Today I have also made:

A double recipe of chicken salad
A double recipe of chopped chicken livers (some from a neighbor)
A double recipe of homemade blue cheese dressing (with a great American blue from Costco)

And for dinner tonight, baked chicken, mushroom risotto, stir fried bok choy – crap, I forgot to bake something delicious for dessert. Maybe a trip to the Dairy Queen is in order.


The pretty blue pot

Many thanks to my dear MIL and FIL for the Christmas gift certificate to Bed, Bath and Beyond. I’ve been there several times, but could never make up my mind. Until last night, that is, when I realized I would only be happy when I bought the pretty French cast iron pot I really wanted. I had never heard of Fontignac before, but they are really made in France, the company has been in business almost 100 years, and it is half the price of Le Creuset. So this morning I pressed it into service as soon as I woke up, and it now holds an utterly delicious pot of bean soup, thanks to Costco’s gourmet bean blend.

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Around My French Table

We ate well tonight. OK, what’s new right? Well, we ate better than we usually do.

Anyone who knows us knows that the last thing we truly need is another cookbook. But Harald has been jonesing to buy Dorie Greenspan’s new cookbook, Around My French Table, since before Christmas. He didn’t get the book for the holidays. But right before Christmas it was mentioned again in our local paper as one of the 10 best coobooks of 2010. So, when He got a Barnes & Noble gift card this holiday, he resolved to buy the book, which we finally picked up today while running errands. We toyed for a few minutes with buying Lidia Bastianich’s newest cookbook, but once I spent a minute flipping through each of them, it was clear that I wanted Dorie’s first. When we got home, I immediately sat down and started going through page after page of recipes I wanted to try. Not content to make something easier for dinner, I decided I would try a few recipes from this new cookbook, and I have to say I loved every one of them -and they weren’t very complicated or time consuming.

Tonight for dinner we had:

Creamy Cauliflower Soup sans cream (garnished with creme fraiche and black truffle oil)
Pumpkin-Gorganzola Flan (incredibly easy and just as delicious)
Almond Flounder Meuniere with creme fraiche mashed potatoes

Now, it is impossible to find flounder right now. According to my local Byerlys fishmonger, the east coast markets have had a heck of a time the past few weeks getting good flounder. I made do with a substitution of red snapper, but I think it might have been better with small walleye filets or sole (yeah, like I could find that either!). There are numerous other recipes in this cookbook I am anxious to try and I think we’ll get started right away.

For the culinary Francophile’s among us, here is a link to the book if you want to check it out.